Atlanta University Center Consortium

AUC Presidents Deliver Strong Case for Investing in HBCUs in New National Tome on Workforce

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Clark Atlanta President Ronald A. Johnson and Morehouse School of Medicine President and Dean Valerie Montgomery Rice provide compelling insights on how a strong American workforce needs the creativity and brain trust developed by historically Black colleges and universities.

Pictured left to right are Ronald A. Johnson, president, Clark Atlanta University; Valerie Montgomery Rice, president Morehouse School of Medicine; and Todd Greene, executive director of the Atlanta University Center Consortium Inc.

(ATLANTA – Nov. 20, 2018) In a new Federal Reserve System-led book, “Investing in America’s Workforce: Improving Outcomes for Workers and Employers,” Clark Atlanta University President Ron A. Johnson and Morehouse School of Medicine President and Dean Valerie Montgomery Rice detail strong evidence about the importance and relevance of HBCUs in the workforce development process. From pipeline to career, they argue that HBCUs are uniquely situated to respond to employer needs and to prepare graduates for long-term success.

Johnson’s essay, Pipelines for Diversified Intellect, Creativity and Innovation not only details the historic contribution of HBCUs in creating strong leaders across corporate America and in other employment contexts, he also cites evidence of how HBCU graduates perform better in the labor market where they have been uniquely prepared with high levels of skills and confidence.  In Promoting the Health of Communities for Long-Term Benefits, Montgomery Rice (joined by Morehouse School of Medicine Vice President David Hefner), address workforce development pipeline by describing an innovative program linking MSM students and faculty to K-5 STEM education.  Because of their strong  traditional ties to marginalized and disinvested communities, HBCUs are well positioned to both positively impact pipelines to college and employment and to contribute to the long-term overall economic performance of these communities.

“Investing in America’s Workforce,” a nearly 1,100-page collaborative book, brings together more than 100 national thought leaders and subject-expert authors and editors to explore the systemic barriers to employment and the strategies and investments to help overcome those barriers.

Pictured with Greene is David Hefner, MSM vice president for Strategy and Institutional Effectiveness.

The three-volume call-to-action is the result of a two-and-a-half-year collaboration between the Federal Reserve System, the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University, the Ray Marshall Center at the University of Texas at Austin, and the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.  The book offers approaches for improving the human capital of America’s labor force, expanding access to jobs, and innovating workforce development funding.

Johnson and Montgomery Rice’s essays are framed by an introduction – “The Critical Role of Historically Black Colleges and Universities in Workforce Development” penned by Atlanta University Center Consortium Executive Director Todd Greene.  Yet another important contribution in this section is from former Morehouse College president and current Harvard University administrator John Silvanus Wilson.  He suggests that workforce-related investments in HBCUs should be directed to institutions best positioned for achieving the strongest outcomes.  Further, in his essay, HBCUs as Pipelines for Diversified Intellect, Creativity and Innovation, Wilson shares that strong endowments, the ability to undertake successful capital campaigns, and maintaining effective governance structures are critical components for HBCUs effectively preparing their graduates for the workplace.

“While we have long recognized the unique value afforded by an HBCU education, presenting this value in the context of the labor market and workforce development is not widely discussed,” said Greene, who also serves as one of “Investing in America’s Workforce” four lead editors. “It is important we continue to invest in institutions like HBCUs that have proven track records of delivering well-prepared workers in a modern economy,” added Greene

“Investing in America’s Workforce: Improving Outcomes for Workers and Employers,” can be downloaded from www.investinwork.org/book, or request a hard copy by reaching emailing Ashley Bozarth at Ashley.Bozarth@atl.frb.org.

Three Atlanta University Center Schools Receive Gift From the Atlanta Hawks in Honor of Their Vice Chairman and Basketball Great Grant Hill

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© Kat Goduco Photo

ATLANTA (August 30, 2018) – Spelman College, Morehouse College and Clark Atlanta University have received a “surprise” gift from the Atlanta Hawks in honor of Grant Hill. The Hawks made the contributions to the Atlanta University Center institutions to recognize Hill, vice chair and part owner of the Hawks, being inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

Steve Koonin, CEO of the Hawks, surprised Hill on Spelman’s campus, Thursday, Aug. 30, with the gift that will benefit 33 students across the AUC. Thirty-three is Hill’s career-long jersey number.

“Grant Hill has been a living emblem of investing in communities and people, including students attending HBCUs,” said Todd Greene, executive director of the Atlanta University Center Consortium. “On behalf of our member institutions, the Atlanta University Center Consortium is grateful for the Atlanta Hawks’ gift of scholarships to our students that celebrates and recognizes a great living legend.”

A seven-time NBA All-Star and two-time NCAA Champion, Hill values the legacy and excellent outcomes of historically Black colleges and universities – particularly because HBCUs give many Black students voices and paths to success they may not have otherwise had.

“Education is something that is very important to me and to my family. What my wife and I have tried to do is to give back through our philanthropy in the world of education,” said Hill during the event. “Going into the hall of fame is a great honor, but to have this now with the AUC is unbelievable. All I can say is thank you, and most importantly thank you for the kids who will benefit from this gift.”

In 2015, Hill became part of the ownership team of the Hawks, which sees this gift as a gateway to strengthening their relationship with the AUC. Their goal is to expose students to off-the-court careers in sports through several initiatives, including shadowing Hawks leaders and participating in internships.

“If there were a person hall of fame, Grant would be at the top of it,” said Koonin of Hill. “Grant is a philanthropist. Grant is a leader. So we thought we would do something a little bit different, in the Hawks voice, to honor Grant’s induction. The most important part is that this university complex will have a small part of Grant; and hopefully, one day, the students who benefit will develop into leaders and people reminiscent of Grant’s character.”

In attendance for the announcement were David Lee, the Hawks executive vice president of external affairs and executive director of the Atlanta Hawks Foundation, Nzinga Shaw, Spelman College, C’2001, the Hawks senior vice president and chief diversity and inclusion officer, and Andrea K. Carter, Spelman College, C’90, the Hawks vice president of corporate social responsibility and inclusion. They were joined by Greene, Mary Schmidt Campbell, Ph.D., president of Spelman College, Ronald Johnson, Ph.D., president of Clark Atlanta University, and Henry Goodgame, vice president for external affairs and alumni engagement at Morehouse College.

About Atlanta University Center Consortium Inc.
Founded in 1929, the AUC Consortium is the world’s oldest and largest contiguous association of historically black colleges and universities in the world. Comprised of its four member institutions — Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College, Morehouse School of Medicine and Spelman College — AUC Consortium represents an intellectual community with a storied tradition of rich culture, scholarship, service and community engagement. Led by its board of directors, the Council of Presidents, the Consortium is a nonprofit organization that operates on behalf of its members to advance each institution’s mission and strategic goals, and seeks to foster collaboration that leverages shared resources of the community and member institutions to maximize opportunities for our students and the community.

About the Atlanta Hawks Basketball Club
With a bold identity and strong new ownership, the Atlanta Hawks Basketball Club and State Farm Arena remain committed to making Atlantans proud on the court and off. The 2014-15 Southeast Division Champions, the Hawks made the postseason in 10 consecutive seasons and reached the Eastern Conference Finals for the first time in franchise history in 2015. Off the court, the organization has built a culture of inclusion, diversity and innovation, all with a touch of Southern Hospitality. It continues into the community where the organization builds bridges through basketball, whether by constructing and refurbishing courts in Atlanta neighborhoods, providing scholarships to our basketball camps, or surprising and delighting our fans with unique Atlanta Hawks experiences. Atlanta Hawks Membership, which includes your seat for every home game for the 2018-19 regular season, is on sale now at www.hawks.com/membership or by calling 866-715-1500! For more information on the Hawks, log on to www.hawks.com today or follow us on twitter @ATLHawks.

About Spelman College
Founded in 1881, Spelman College is a leading liberal arts college widely recognized as the global leader in the education of women of African descent. Located in Atlanta, the College’s picturesque campus is home to 2,100 students. Spelman is the country’s leading producer of Black women who complete Ph.D.s in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The College’s status is confirmed by U.S. News and World Report, which ranked Spelman No. 61 among all liberal arts colleges and No. 1 among historically Black colleges and universities. The Wall Street Journal ranked the College No. 3, nationally, in terms of student satisfaction. Outstanding alumnae include Children’s Defense Fund Founder Marian Wright Edelman, Starbucks Group President and COO Rosalind Brewer, former Acting Surgeon General and Spelman’s first alumna President Audrey Forbes Manley, global bioinformatics geneticist Janina Jeff and author Pearl Cleage. For more information, visit www.spelman.edu.

AUCC INC. RECEIVES HALF-MILLION DOLLAR GRANT TO IMPROVE ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT ON ITS MEMBER CAMPUSES

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Tamala Fortson
Associate Director/Business Manager
404-978-2177
tfortson@aucenter.edu

Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta award will help campuses become more

eco-friendly and improve their bottom lines.

ATLANTA (Aug. 6, 2018) – To adopt eco-friendly practices, reduce the environmental footprint, and at the same time improve the bottom line of its member institutions, the Atlanta University Center Consortium Inc. has received a $500,000 Grants to Green Campus Implementation grant from the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta.

“This is a wonderful follow up to the Assessment services award we received in 2016 from Southface, and it is a testament to the great collaborative work we are undertaking in the Atlanta University Center,” said Todd Greene, executive director for AUCC Inc. “With a projected overall cost savings of nearly half-a-million dollars, this project allows our member institutions to improve the double bottom-line in both costs savings and environmental sustainability.”

Launched in 2008, Grants to Green gives nonprofits the opportunity to renovate or build healthier work places that are environmentally efficient and provides environmentally focused knowledge and funding to strengthen nonprofits in the Atlanta region. Grants to Green is a partnership initiative between the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta, a respected grant maker and community leader in metro Atlanta and the Southeastern region, and Southface, an expert in “green” building science, design and construction. The Kendeda Fund, a longtime funder of the Community Foundation, funds the Grants to Green initiative.

“This initiative is in line with one the Atlanta University Center’s key areas of transformation – environment and sustainability,” said Morehouse School of Medicine President Valerie Montgomery Rice, board chair of the Atlanta University Center Consortium.  “We appreciate the partnership of The Coca-Cola Foundation on this great opportunity to further our sustainability efforts and to positively affect growth for the entire consortium.”

After receiving assessments of AUC facilities and recommendations for how to improve efficiency, AUCC its member institutions applied for and were awarded the $500,000 Implementation grant for eco-friendly improvements that include upgrading to LED lighting and controls, replacing and retrofitting inefficient plumbing fixtures, receiving sewage abatement credits from evaporation of water returned to the system.

With the assistance of Grants to Green, AUCC member institutions will reduce their energy consumption by more than 23 percent collectively. This equates to greenhouse gas emissions from 505 passenger vehicles driven for one year, saving roughly 2,358 metric tons of carbon dioxide, known for its danger to environmental and human health.

For more information about the green efforts implemented at AUCC member institutions, please contact Bonita Dukes at Clark Atlanta University; André E. Bertrand at Morehouse; Lawrence Jones at Morehouse School of Medicine; and Don Blackston and Art Frazier at Spelman. For more information about the Grants to Green Initiative, visit www.cfgreateratlanta.org, or email GrantstoGreen@cfgreateratlanta.org.

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About the Atlanta University Center Consortium Inc.

Founded in 1929, the Atlanta University Center Consortium is the world’s oldest association of historically Black colleges and universities. Comprised of four member institutions – Clark Atlanta UniversityMorehouse CollegeMorehouse School of Medicine, and Spelman College – the Consortium is a vibrant intellectual community with a long tradition of scholarship, service and community engagement. AUC Consortium Inc. is a nonprofit organization that operates on behalf of its members to advance each institution’s mission and strategic goals by fostering collaboration, managing center wide initiatives, offering services that benefit our students and community, and leveraging our shared resources. Visit us at aucenter.edu/, or on Facebook or Twitter.

About the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta

Since 1951, the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta has been connecting the passions of philanthropists with the purposes of nonprofits doing that work. With 65 years serving the 23-county Atlanta region and a robust team of experts, the Community Foundation manages the behind-the-scenes details, empowering our donors to focus on the joy of giving. The Community Foundation is a top-20 community foundation nationally with approximately $900 million in current assets and is Georgia’s second largest foundation. Through its quality services and innovative leadership on community issues, the Foundation received more than $113 million from donors in 2015 (unaudited) and distributed more than $139 million that same year to support nonprofits throughout the region and beyond. In 2016 Charity Navigator named the Community Foundation a four-star rated nonprofit, its top distinction. For more information, visit: cfgreateratlanta.org or connect with the Foundation via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

AUCC COUNCIL OF PRESIDENTS PICKS TODD GREENE TO HEAD RE-ENVISIONED AUCC INC.

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As new executive director of the newly structured organization, presidents charge Greene to transform the 90-year-old organization.

ATLANTA (June 11, 2018) – After a 12-month executive search, the Council of Presidents for Atlanta University Center Consortium Inc. announces the appointment of Todd Greene as executive director of the Atlanta University Center Consortium, Inc.

Greene joins AUCC after 10 years with the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta as vice president of Community and Economic Development. In his new position with the Consortium, he will be responsible for transforming and reorganizing AUCC, focusing on four key areas: health and wellness; environment and sustainability; technology innovation; and education.

“Todd’s body of work and enthusiasm aligned with where we want to see the Atlanta University Center to ascend. Our ‘re-envisioned vision’ for the Atlanta University Center Consortium is to shift it from an organization that focuses on coordinating individual programs and governance councils to an innovative, think-tank focused on thought-leadership, collaboration, and innovation for strategic initiatives that yield meaningful and effective outcomes for the Atlanta University Center,” said Dr. Montgomery Rice, chair for the Council of Presidents. “Additionally, our vision for the AUCC is to provide a collaborative space to incubate innovative best practices relevant to the broader higher education community, with special focus and emphasis on underrepresented groups in higher education.”

With nearly 20 years of executive leadership experience in higher education, and community, economic and workplace development, Greene has a strong track-record of leading strategic transformations, including his previous roles at the Federal Reserve, and his prior position at Georgia Tech where he led various centers and programs focused on applied economic development.

“I am anxious to leverage my experiences and networks to hasten transformative change for students, faculty, and staff, and also for Atlanta and national stakeholders,” said Greene, who will assume his responsibilities June 13, 2018. “The presidents have articulated broad and ambitious goals for the campuses and for the collective role in the region and nationally.”

Atlanta University Center Consortium Inc.

Founded in 1929, the AUC Consortium is the world’s oldest and largest contiguous association of historically black colleges and universities in the world. Comprised of its four member institutions — Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College, Morehouse School of Medicine and Spelman College — AUC Consortium represents an intellectual community with a storied tradition of rich culture, scholarship, service and community engagement. Led by its board of directors, the Council of Presidents, the Consortium is a nonprofit organization that operates on behalf of its members to advance each institution’s mission and strategic goals, and seeks to foster collaboration that leverages shared resources of the community and member institutions to maximize opportunities for our students and the community.

Spelman College is a Top Volunteer School for Peace Corps

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Annually, the Peace Corps shares its list of top volunteering-producing schools, and each year Spelman College is on the list. Tied at No. 4 on the 2018 list with five other small colleges and universities with fewer than 5,000 undergraduates, Spelman sent 14 volunteers to serve in the Peace Corps.

To see the complete list and press release, visit the Peace Corps.

Chevrolet and NNPA Offer Journalism Fellowship to HBCU Fellows

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Fellows will receive a combined $80,000 in scholarships and summer internships

The 2017 “Discover the Unexpected” Atlanta fellows (from left to right): Jordan Fisher, Clark Atlanta University; Kelsey Jones, Spelman College; Darrell Williams, Morehouse College; Chevrolet Diversity marketing manager, Michelle Alexander; Tiana Hunt, Clark Atlanta University; Ayron Lewallan, Morehouse College and; Taylor Burris, Spelman College.

WASHINGTON D.C. – Chevrolet is putting more students in the driver’s seat with the expansion of its Discover the Unexpected fellowship program. Now in its second year, DTU provides college students from historically black colleges and universities the opportunity to change the narrative of media reporting in the African-American community with the help of the National Newspaper Publishers Association.

The eight 2017 DTU Fellowship Program students are: Taylor Burris of Spelman College, Darrell Williams of Morehouse College, Jordan Fisher of Clark Atlanta University, Tiana Hunt of Clark Atlanta University, Kelsey Jones of Spelman College, Ayron Lewallen of Morehouse College, Noni Marshall of Howard University and Alexa Imani Spencer of Howard University.

Students will work in partnership with NNPA member papers in Washington D.C., Atlanta, New Orleans and Raleigh.

The official launch of the 2017 “Discover the Unexpected” fellows Program in Atlanta, (from left to right) Chevrolet Diversity marketing manager, Michelle Alexander; emcee-songwriter, philanthropist, actress, and DTU ambassador and spokesperson MC Lyte; National Newspapers Publishers Association President and CEO Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr.; and Clark Atlanta University School of Arts and Sciences Dean Danille K. Taylor, Ph.D.

“Last year we were honored to launch the DTU fellowship program at Howard University and meet a group of very talented journalism students,” said U.S. vice president of Chevrolet Marketing Paul Edwards. “Their enthusiasm, insight and determination made the selection process extremely difficult. We’re excited to send more trailblazers on the road to highlight the positive, inspire hope and document the legacy of African American voices for generations to come.”

This year, DTU fellows will work with editors and reporters from The Washington Informer, The Atlanta Voice, The Louisiana Weekly and The Carolinian.

“The NNPA is looking forward to welcoming the next group of fellows to the program,” said NNPA president and CEO Dr. Ben Chavis Jr. “Our 2016 fellows showed that despite the negative perceptions seen in the media, there are also beautiful and powerful stories in African-American neighborhoods across the country. Our 2017 fellows will continue sharing stories of community advocates, making impactful and lasting changes on a local and global level.”

The fellowship program is open to communications, mass media, and visual arts students. A panel of judges consisting of NNPA and AUCC staff conducted on-site interviews during the program’s AUCC launch.

Chevrolet will award eight $10,000 scholarships to each fellow and provide a stipend to defray the costs of traveling to and from school as they report on their stories. In addition to the financial investment, Chevrolet will provide each fellowship team access to the Next Generation 2018 Chevrolet Equinox during their reporting assignments.Legendary lyricist and hip-hop pioneer MC Lyte is the program’s national spokesperson and was on hand to kick-off the launch in Atlanta.Information about the Discover the Unexpected Fellowship Program can be found at www.nnpa.org/dtu.

Check out DTU photos.

 

CONTACTS:
Sonya Lewis
Carol H. Williams Advertising
708-439-0326
Sonya.Lewis@Carolhwilliams.com

Lester Booker Jr.
GM Diversity Communications
313-618-3946
lester.bookerjr@gm.com 

 

 

AUC Schools Rank High Among Peace Corps’ Top Volunteer-Producing Historically Black Colleges and Universities

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Contact:
Emily Webb, Public Affairs Specialist
Peace Corps East Region Office
ewebb@peacecorps.gov
212.352.5455

Faith Toran, Spelman College Class of 2013, was a Peace Corps Education Volunteer in Burkina Faso from August 2013 to September 2015.

ATLANTA – Today, the Peace Corps announced its 2017 rankings of the top volunteer-producing Historically Black Colleges and Universities and two Atlanta area schools were included on the annual list.

This year, Spelman College ranks No. 2 with 11 alumni volunteering in the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Mozambique, Namibia, Peru, Rwanda, Togo, Zambia and Guinea. In addition, Morehouse College appears on the list at No. 5 with three alumni serving in Malawi, Mozambique and Namibia. Morehouse and Spelman both place among the top five HBCUs in the nation for the third and sixth consecutive times, respectively.

“Historically Black Colleges and Universities cultivate a commitment to community-oriented education that inspires their graduates to pursue international service and make an impact abroad with the Peace Corps,” Acting Peace Corps Director Sheila Crowley said. “Each year, a growing number of HBCU alumni join the Peace Corps with important experiences and perspectives that give communities overseas a better understanding of the diversity of the United States.”

Spelman College also appeared on Peace Corps’ national list of top volunteer-producing colleges and universities this year, ranking No. 7 among small undergraduate schools. The Atlanta area ranks No. 9 among Peace Corps’ top volunteer-producing metropolitan areas with 140 residents currently serving worldwide.

Service in the Peace Corps is a life-defining, hands-on leadership experience that offers volunteers the opportunity to travel to a community overseas and make a lasting difference in the lives of others. College graduates with Peace Corps volunteer experience gain cross-cultural, language and community development skills that build upon their education and give them a competitive edge for career and advanced education opportunities.

The Peace Corps has recruiters across the country that visit HBCUs and work closely with prospective volunteers. By hiring dedicated diversity recruiters and hosting diversity-focused recruitment events, the agency aims to build an inclusive volunteer force and ensure that all Americans know about service opportunities with the Peace Corps.

A simple and personal Peace Corps application process can be completed online in about one hour. Applicants can learn more about service opportunities by visiting the Peace Corps website and connecting with a recruiter.

Peace Corps’ 2017 top volunteer-producing Historically Black Colleges and Universities are:

  1. Howard University: 18 currently serving volunteers
  2. Spelman College: 11 currently serving volunteers
  3. Florida A&M University: seven currently serving volunteers
  4. Hampton University: four currently serving volunteers
  5. Central State University: three currently serving volunteers
  6. Morehouse College: three currently serving volunteers
  7. Prairie View A&M University: three currently serving volunteers

* Rankings are calculated based on fiscal year 2016 data as of September 30, 2016, as self-reported by Peace Corps volunteers.

About the Peace Corps: The Peace Corps sends Americans with a passion for service abroad on behalf of the United States to work with communities and create lasting change. Volunteers develop sustainable solutions to address challenges in education, health, economic development, agriculture, environment and youth development. Through their Peace Corps experience, Volunteers gain a unique cultural understanding and a life-long commitment to service that positions them to succeed in today’s global economy. Since President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps in 1961, more than 225,000 Americans of all ages have served in 141 countries worldwide. For more information, visit peacecorps.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Four CAU Alumni Vie for Council Seats in New City of South Fulton

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ATLANTA (Feb. 27, 2017)   The crowded field of candidates for elected office in the new city of South Fulton includes three more Clark Atlanta University alumni.  Catherine Foster Rowell, Ph.D., Rochelle Lindsey and Darris Rollins are vying for seats on the South Fulton City Council in districts 1, 4 and 3 respectively.  They join CAU alumnus and current CAU graduate student Johnny Surry in bids to become the first elected leaders in the recently created city.

Read more.

Loretta Parham named 2017 ACRL Academic/ Research Librarian of the Year

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For Immediate Release
Jan. 25, 2017

Contact:

Chase Ollis
Program Coordinator
ACRL
collis@ala.org

CHICAGO — Loretta Parham, CEO and director of the Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library is the 2017 Association of College and Research Libraries’ Academic/Research Librarian of the Year. The award, sponsored by GOBI Library Solutions from EBSCO, recognizes an outstanding member of the library profession who has made a significant national or international contribution to academic/research librarianship and library development.

Parham will receive a $5,000 award during the Middle Keynote session on Thursday, March 23, at the ACRL 2017 Conference in Baltimore.

“Loretta Parham’s drive, activism, and innovative approaches to library transformation have had a broad and sustained impact well beyond our field and she is the absolute embodiment of the ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year Award,” said Michael Courtney, chair of the ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year Award Committee and outreach and engagement librarian at the Indiana University Libraries. “Parham’s dedication to diversity and inclusion, her role as a passionate advocate for libraries and librarians, and her seemingly endless list of accomplishments exemplifies the spirit of this award. As one reviewer noted, ‘few, if any, possess the panorama of skills that are embodied in Ms. Parham’.”

“This award is such an honor and I am tremendously grateful for this acknowledgment of my passion and career commitment to service, libraries, and learning,” Parham said. “The credit for these successes should be shared by many others with whom I have worked, and to each of them and ACRL I say thank you.”

Highly respected by the library and higher education communities, Parham tirelessly worked to transform the Robert W. Woodruff Library, shared by Clark Atlanta University, the Interdenominational Theological Center, Morehouse College, and Spelman College, into a modern 21st century research facility known for its distinctive spaces and service. Under her leadership, the library has become widely recognized for its outreach to students, faculty, AUC alumni, and the wider Atlanta community.

In addition to the transformation of physical space, Parham expanded the library’s stewardship of historically significant special collections. Among these is the Morehouse College Martin Luther King Jr. Collection, acquired by Morehouse in 2006 and housed in the Woodruff Library. With oversight for all aspects of conservation and preservation of the collection, Parham successfully steered a smooth and secure transition of the papers from Sotheby’s auction house in New York to Atlanta and provided strategic direction for processing and digitization of the collection, making it accessible for public use within an impressive two-year timeframe.

The library extends this commitment to public service by acting as a cultural hub, offering symposia, art exhibits, civic discussions, voter registration seminars, distinguished speakers, and historical presentations to the AUC community and Atlanta residents. As the result of her vision and leadership, the Robert W. Woodruff Library received both the 2012 IIDA/ ALA Award for the transformation of library space and the 2016 ACRL Excellence in Academic Libraries Award.

“Loretta Parham epitomizes the innovative, visionary spirit of today’s academic and research librarians,” noted ACRL Executive Director Mary Ellen K. Davis. “Widely recognized as passionate advocate for libraries and librarians, her commitment to a transformational vision of the academic library as a center for research, learning, and outreach has earned her the respect of the institutions she serves, the library and higher education communities, and indeed, the general public.”

In addition to her work transforming the Woodruff Library, Parham is known as a champion for librarianship and higher education, advocating with passion and clarity for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), their significant special collections, and their value regionally, nationally, and globally. She has personally served as a mentor to hundreds of librarians and is the co-founding director and founding Board Chair of the HBCU Library Alliance. Established in 2002, the Alliance is a consortium of White House-designated HBCUs with a mission to transform its membership by developing leaders, preserving collections, and planning for future. Due to Parham’s leadership, the Alliance has been the recipient of or project partner in several Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grants awards strengthening library services related to leadership development, photographic preservation, digitization services, and library support of faculty services.

An active member of ALA and ACRL, Parham served as a member of the ACRL Board of Directors as director-at-large  (2011-15), member of the College & Research Libraries Editorial Board (2002-08), and as a member of the ALA Committee on Accreditation (2016-20). Parham additionally served as a member of the OCLC Board of Trustees and chair of the OCLC Membership Committee (2012-17), treasurer of the Oberlin Group Consortium (2011-15), and as chair of the Board of Directors and past finance chair of the SOLINET Library Network (2000-04).

Her publications include “Achieving Diversity: A How-To-Do-It Manual for Librarians” (with B. Dewey, 2006), “Robert W. Woodruff Library of the Atlanta University Center, Custodian of the Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection: ‘Until Further Notice.’” in RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage (2007), and “Redesigning Services at The Robert W. Woodruff Library of the Atlanta University Center, Inc.” in Library Workflow Redesign: Six Case Studies (with C. Hart, 2007).

Prior to joining the Robert W. Woodruff Library in 2004, Parham served as director of the Hampton University Harvey Library (1998-2004), director/ administrator of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation (1997-98), deputy director of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh (1991-97), and in a variety of positions at the Chicago Public Library (1977-91).

Parham received her B.S. in Communications-Broadcasting from Southern Illinois University and M.L.S. from the University of Michigan, which honored her with the Distinguished Alumni Award from the School of Information in 2016 in recognition of her service to the profession.

The ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year award dates back to 1978, and recent award winners include Susan K. Nutter (2016); Robert A. Seal (2015); Tim Bucknall (2014); Patricia Iannuzzi (2013); Paula T. Kaufman (2012); Janice Welburn (2011); Maureen Sullivan (2010); Gloriana St. Clair (2009); Peter Hernon (2008); Lizabeth (Betsy) Wilson (2007); Ray English (2006); Ravindra Nath (R. N.) Sharma (2005); Tom Kirk (2004); Ross Atkinson, (2003); and Shelley Phipps (2002).

For more information regarding the award, or a complete list of past recipients, please visit the awards section of the ACRL website.

About ACRL

The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) is the higher education association for librarians. Representing nearly 11,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) develops programs, products and services to help academic and research librarians learn, innovate and lead within the academic community. Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning and transforming scholarship. ACRL is on the web at acrl.org, Facebook at facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

About GOBI Library Solutions from EBSCO

GOBI® Library Solutions from EBSCO, formerly YBP Library Services, offers over 13 million print and ebooks to academic, research and special libraries worldwide. From streamlining workflows to partnering with library staff, GOBI Library Solutions is committed to providing the best solution for libraries’ acquisition, collection development and technical service needs. For more than 40 years, the mission has remained same—to partner with libraries in providing access to the broadest selection of scholarly content available.

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