Atlanta University Center Consortium

Banks Shares Her Building Blocks for Success

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India on her GE Transportation internship

As a toddler, India Banks had a knack for stacking blocks. Around 5, she graduated from building blocks to Legos. Banks became so good at constructing Legos that she even entered a Lego competition when she got older.

“From there, she progressed to K’Nex and with no instructions that girl was building amusement park rides and had things flying around,” said her mother, Bobette Banks, director of Communications for Greater Capital Area Association of Realtors. “When we would ask her how she figured it out, she would say, ‘I just look at the pictures; I don’t need words.’” It was then her parents recognized they should encourage her to consider a career in engineering.

“I originally thought I wanted to do sports medicine and physical therapy when I was in high school,” said the 22-year-old dual-degree engineering student. “STEM fields like math and science are not always encouraged to us as options, and it can often be daunting when faced with these challenging subjects. So, I’m happy my parents steered me in that direction.”

Recently in Atlanta to attend her graduation from Spelman College, the mathematics/civil engineering student just completed her first year of engineering school with Atlanta University Center Consortium partner engineering institution University of Michigan. A three-two program, the Dual Degree Engineering Program offers the best of both worlds for AUC students.

While attending Spelman, Banks said she experienced its great sisterhood. “At Spelman, I was nurtured in an intimate environment with my peers who happened to be predominately black females, like myself,” wrote Banks in her Michigan profile. “[Spelman] challenged me to find something unique about myself because I was no longer a minority.”

Settling in at Michigan has been as she puts it, “very different and a lot bigger.” When you compare a student body of approximately 2,100 women to a university of more than 10,000 engineers and an overall student body of 44,000-plus, a mental adjustment does have to take place.

“Luckily for me, I have a lot of men from Morehouse in the [Civil and Environmental Engineering] department with me,” said Banks, who also plays classical piano. “This makes the campus feel a lot smaller and more manageable.” Not only does she have Morehouse brothers, Banks has found closeness and friendship in a CEE department sisterhood, women with a common goal.

This summer, Banks is interning in at Whiting-Turner, a construction management, general contracting, design-build and integrated project delivery services company. In addition to Whiting-Turner, Banks has spent summers interning with the National Society of Black Engineers’ SEEK program, GE Transportation and IBM. It was through these internships she learned specifically she wanted to become a civil engineer. “She always had a curious mind and a determined spirit,” said her mother. “I think she will make a great engineer, and I’m not just saying that because I’m her mother. I’m saying it because of her work ethic, her intelligence, and her commitment to doing things until she gets it right.”

For Banks, the journey from Spelman to Michigan was made easier through the guidance and support of the Consortium. Coaching, scholarship, friendship, and a myriad of employment and internship opportunities are offered to all registered DDEP students in the AUC.

“DDEP has been great to me. Everyone in the DDEP office has always been very sweet to me and supportive,” said the Silver Spring, Maryland, native. “The financial support has made paying for school more manageable for my parents, and I can’t thank DDEP enough.”

Her father, Medaris Banks, a pharmaceutical sales representative for Merck echoed that sentiment, saying: “We cannot stop talking about how much we’ve appreciated you all taking such good care of India these past three years. Being a part of the AUC was a rewarding experience for her, and you all were an integral part of that.”

Michigan is a Great Place to Learn, Work and Play

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AUCC students on campus 2017

Established in 2004, the University of Michigan College of Engineering Dual Degree in Engineering is a partnership between the University of Michigan and the colleges of the Atlanta University Center Consortium. This unique collaboration provides a successful pathway for students to complement a liberal arts degree with an engineering degree from one of the world’s top universities.

Rich in learning experiences and opportunities and a phenomenal launching pad for success, the University of Michigan drives the thriving economy in Ann Arbor, Michigan, the state’s sixth largest city. Abundant in research programs and integrated technology implemented and supported by Michigan graduates, Ann Arbor offers a broad cultural heritage of visual and performing art. In 2017, Forbes ranked Ann Arbor the best college town in the country.

As the No. 1 ranked-U.S. public research university by the National Science Foundation with $1.39 billion in research expenditures, 2.8 million square feet of lab space for research and teaching, and 428 new invention reports, Michigan houses one of the top engineering schools in the country. The UM College of Engineering maintains top-10 rankings in nearly every one of its undergraduate and graduate engineering program.

UM/AUCC DDEP women celebrating Spelman’s Founders Day

Why Michigan Engineering?

All Michigan Engineering’s graduate and undergraduate programs rand No. 5 and No. 6 in the nation. Its engineering specialties include aerospace, biomedical, chemical, climate and space sciences and engineering, civil, computer science, electrical, environmental, industrial and operations, materials science and engineering, mechanical, naval architecture and marine, and nuclear and radiological sciences.

Exceptional Leadership

Dean Alec Gallimore

Our dean is a “Rocket Scientist”, no, really! Alec D. Gallimore is the Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering at The University of Michigan, as well as the Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Professor and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering. His lab works with NASA and the U.S. Air Force on a prototype propulsion system that is considering a future mission for sending humans to Mars.

Applying to the College of Engineering
Begin your application to the College of Engineering by visiting: http://www.engin.umich.edu/college/admissions/undergrad/transfer/applying.

The Michigan Difference
Transitioning from the AUC to a top-tier engineering school has its innate challenges and multiple benefits. At Michigan Engineering, we provide a network of support to ease the transition from the time you seriously consider Michigan until you complete your degree. Here are some of the ways we facilitate the process:

UM’s Commitment to Diversity is Broad and Deep

President Mark Schlissel

“At the University of Michigan, our dedication to academic excellence for the public good is inseparable from our commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion. It is central to our mission as an educational institution to ensure that each member of our community has full opportunity to thrive in our environment, for we believe that diversity is key to individual flourishing, educational excellence and the advancement of knowledge.”
President Schlissel’s Charge to the U-M Community for a Strategic Planning Process on Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

The Center for Engineering Diversity & Outreach
CEDO is a hub for students and student organizations from diverse backgrounds. CEDO provides expertise, leadership, and programming that supports the College of Engineering’s belief that an excellent educational experience is intrinsically linked to fostering a climate that celebrates diversity, equity, and inclusion for faculty, staff and students.

Scholarships

Visiting student group on State Street in Ann Arbor

Students who are admitted to Michigan Engineering receive an Engineering Scholarship of Honor. The scholarship award is $30,000 per year for up to 2.5 years for out of state students, and $15,000 per year for up to 2.5 years for in-state students.

Students currently enrolled in the College of Engineering, and doing well academically, are encouraged to review, and consider applying for the scholarships additional engineering scholarships. The two most common scholarships awarded are the College of Engineering Need- and Merit-Based Scholarships, and the Industry Sponsored Scholarships. Visit https://scholarships.engin.umich.edu/current-students/ for more information.

UM/AUCC DDEP Senior Leadership Group
SLG is a student-driven organization created by upper-level UM/AUCC DDEP students. Their goal is to maintain the UM/AUCC DDEP community, recruit students to the University of Michigan, and help ease the transition from AUC to Michigan Engineering.

Michigan Difference Summer Transition Program
The Michigan Difference Summer Transition Program provides resources and experiences for AUC DDEP students to be engaged in summer experiences on UM’s campus to help ease the transition from the AUC to a top-ranked engineering college.  

  • Summer Research Opportunity and Admissions Pathway is a program for AUC dual degree engineering students. If you are interested in a deeper dive into engineering research to address grand challenges that face our nation, this summer opportunity always you to work in labs of Michigan Engineering world-renowned engineering faculty for 10 weeks. The program includes room and board, travel and a stipend.
  • Michigan Department of Transportation offers an opportunity for students from historically black colleges and universities who have completed their first, second, or third year of college to do a paid summer internship with them. The program helps students understand whether civil engineering is a match for them, and they gain exposure to the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering. Participants from the AUCC reside on the University of Michigan’s campus and have an opportunity to explore the College of Engineering and the vast resources available at Michigan.

    Faculty-student mentoring dinner

Additional Opportunities

The breadth of Michigan allows for almost unlimited opportunities and resources to ensure your success. Faculty, staff, and offices are committed to help you make your Michigan experience all that you want it to be. Explore the possibilities, set your goals, and take advantage of the many ways to ensure you reach them.

Mentoring programs include:

  • Partnerships between faculty, undergraduate students, and graduate students to support the learning and success of DDEP scholars.
  • Monthly dinners with faculty and graduate students create multiple opportunities for DDEP students such as research, extended employment networking and one-on-one mentoring.

NSBE social

Student Life

Matthew Nelson is NSBE national chair and a UM graduate student

Michigan is home to over 1,300 student organizations ranging from Greek to social activism, including the National Society of Black Engineers, Society of Women Engineers, and project teams like BLUElab and the Solar Car Team. Michigan Engineers hold prominent offices at all levels of the NSBE organization, with Matt Nelson, Michigan graduate student, currently serving as national chair of NSBE.. You will be inspired and challenged and your world will expand as you work with peers from every state and over 114 nations. Ann Arbor is the “quintessential college town” — vibrant, friendly, and rich in culture. The school spirit is amazing, and Michigan athletics are always a source of pride and excitement. Go Blue!

Morehouse College Announces the Passing of Interim President William J. ‘Bill’ Taggart

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Morehouse Community reflects on the life and legacy of a devoted and respected Morehouse leader

ATLANTA  (June 8, 2017) – The Morehouse College Board of Trustees is mourning the loss of Interim President William J. “Bill” Taggart. Interim President Taggart passed away unexpectedly Thursday at his home in Atlanta.

“We are deeply saddened by the sudden passing of Bill Taggart, a beloved colleague, father and friend whom I’ve known for many years,” said Willie Woods, ’85, Chairman of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees. “For the past two years, Bill devoted himself wholeheartedly to Morehouse College and we were pleased when he assumed the role of Interim President. We are eternally grateful for his loyal support, counsel and the leadership he provided to students, faculty and alumni.”

Woods continued, “Bill was a good friend and a beloved member of the Morehouse community. He was a strong leader who had a positive impact on Morehouse College, the greater Atlanta business community, and all those who knew him. Bill leaves behind a long legacy of commitment to others and unwavering integrity. On behalf of the Board of Trustees, and the entire Morehouse Community, we extend our sincerest condolences to his family, friends and loved ones he leaves behind during this difficult time.”

An Atlanta native, Interim President Taggart was appointed to lead Morehouse College on April 7, 2017. He brought more than 30 years of professional experience to the role.Prior to that, Interim President Taggart served as the College’s Chief Operating Officer, beginning in 2015.

Interim President Taggart worked closely with the Board of Trustees, students, faculty, staff, and alumni to lead and transform the institutional development, technology, campus operations, and human resources functions of the College. During this time, he also served as the external relations liaison to the Atlanta business and civic community, as well as with corporate America and various global philanthropic organizations.

Outside of Morehouse College, Interim President Taggart was actively involved in various business and civic organizations. He served as CEO of Atlanta Life Financial Group and was a key member of 100 Black Men of America, as well as the Rotary Club of Atlanta. He also served as chairman of the Atlanta Business League, and was a board member of The Carter Center, Woodruff Arts Center, Westside Future Fund, Carver Bank, and Children Healthcare of Atlanta. He was recently named to the 2018 Class of Leadership Atlanta. Interim President Taggart’s contributions within and outside of Morehouse College are a reflection of his immense dedication and commitment to his community.

The Board of Trustees will be working internally to determine its next steps and the future direction of the College. Provost Michael Hodge will serve as Acting President until a new Interim President is named by the Board of Trustees.

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Ranked America’s fifth “Most Entrepreneurial College” by Forbes Magazine in 2015, Morehouse College is the nation’s largest liberal arts college for men. Founded in 1867, the College enrolls approximately 2,100 students and historically has conferred more bachelor’s degrees on black men than any other institution in the world. Morehouse College is one of the two top producers of Rhodes Scholars among HBCUs. Prominent alumni include Martin Luther King Jr., Nobel Peace Prize laureate; Dr. David Satcher, former U.S. Surgeon General; Shelton “Spike” Lee, American filmmaker; Maynard H. Jackson, the first African American mayor of Atlanta, Ga.; and Jeh Johnson, former Secretary of Homeland Security.

AUCC Mourns the Loss of Bill Taggart

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The Atlanta University Center Consortium is deeply saddened by the sudden loss of Morehouse College Interim President William J. “Bill” Taggart.  This is a devastating loss to  the Atlanta University Center.  As the newest administrative leader in the consortium, Interim President Taggart was a trusted and valued leader, businessman and friend.

The students, faculty, and staff of Spelman College, Clark Atlanta University, and Morehouse School of Medicine offer profound condolences to our partners at Morehouse College and the Taggart family during this trying time.   We surround our Morehouse College colleagues and fellow students with open arms of love and support.

Valerie Montgomery Rice, MD.
Chair of the AUC Council of Presidents
President and Dean Morehouse School of Medicine

AUC Commencement Roundup

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Morehouse School of Medicine graduates received a welcomed surprise at its 33rd commencement exercises.

From Saturday, May 20, to Monday, May 22, Atlanta University Center institutions celebrated graduation ceremonies for more than 1,600 students. In Morehouse School of Medicine’s commencement exercises Saturday, the 2017 graduating class of 57 medical doctors, 11 doctorate candidates and 41 public health, medical science, and clinical research master’s degree candidates received a welcomed surprise from MSM President and Dean Dr. Valerie Montgomery Rice.

Find out about the surprise.

Morehouse College graduates were told by speaker Van Jones they will “confront a radically new era.”

Early Sunday morning in Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel, CNN political analyst Van Jones told nearly 300 Morehouse College graduates they “must lead the charge of a new, post-Obama era” at the college’s 133rd commencement. Included in the 300 were perfect 4.0 GPA co-valedictorians Michael C. Scott, of Rockville, Maryland, an economics major, and Douglas Bowen, of Montego Bay, Jamaica, also an economics major.

Check out Morehouse’s Facebook photos.

Spelman College co-valedictorians Muhire Kwizera (at podium) and K’yal Bannister (right).

Sunday afternoon, Spelman College, also perfect, 4.0 co-valedictorians, Muhire Kwizera, a mathematics major from Kigali, Rwanda, K’yal Bannister, a chemistry/dual degree engineering major from Bushnell, Florida, and 488 other graduates were told by Valerie Jarrett, former senior adviser to President Barack Obama: “Change often seems impossible until we make it inevitable.”

See Spelman’s commencement photo gallery.

Hometown girl Jakayla Woolridge was named Clark Atlanta

Clark Atlanta University valedictorian Jakayla Woolridge.

University’s valedictorian. A product of Atlanta Public Schools’ Carver Early College, Woolridge graduated with more than 700 CAU classmates receiving their bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral and specialist degrees.

Experience CAU’s 2017 commencement energy on Twitter.

AUC’s 2017 Commencement Exercises

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Graduation serves as a life-changing experience and marks both a beginning and end. In the Projections of Education Statistics to 2017 report by the National Center for Educations Statistics, colleges and universities will confer approximately 2,667,000 bachelor’s, master’s, doctor’s and first-professional degrees on graduates. The Atlanta University Center will contribute more than 1,700 to that number. In May, the four AUC Consortium institutions will mark their commencement exercises with speakers from the nation’s most notable business, civic and political landscapes. It is the time when administrators, families and friends all come together for the big weekends of caps, gowns and tassels. It is the time to pray, celebrate honorary degree recipients, commencement speakers, and the all-important graduate.

Andrea C. White, Ph.D.

Baccalaureate Services

Beginning Saturday, May 20, 2017, at 9 a.m., Spelman College will host Andrea C. White, Ph.D., associate professor of theology and culture at Union Theological Seminary in New York as its baccalaureate speaker; on the same day at 3 p.m., Morehouse College will host the Rev. Dr. Otis J. Moss Jr., ’56, pastor emeritus of Mt. Olivet Institutional Baptist Church in Chicago and the Rev. Dr. Otis J. Moss III, ’92, pastor of Trinity Baptist Church in Chicago. Clark Atlanta University will hold its baccalaureate services Sunday, May 21 at 10 a.m. with the Rev. Olu Brown, senior pastor of Atlanta’s Impact Church.

Commencement Exercises

John Lewis

 

Morehouse School of Medicine kicks off its 33rd commencement exercises Saturday, May 20 at 9 a.m. with the indomitable civil rights icon and 5th District U.S. Rep. John Lewis. He will also receive an honorary doctorate of humane letters.

Van Jones

At 8 a.m., Sunday, May 21 on Morehouse College’s Century Campus, CNN political correspondent and former White House policy adviser to President Barack Obama Van Jones will deliver the college’s 133rd commencement address. For more information, visit Morehouse.

Lawyer, businesswoman and civic leader Valerie Jarrett will do the honors at the 130th commencement exercises for Spelman College. The longest-serving senior adviser to President Barack Obama will deliver her address Sunday, May 21 at 3 p.m. at the Georgia International Convention enter. For more information, visit Spelman.

Willarm Pickard

Valerie Jarrett

After the May weekend of ceremonies, Clark Atlanta University will hold its 2017 commencement exercises with entrepreneur William Pickard, Ph.D. Chairman of the Global Automotive Alliance, co-managing partner of the MGM Grand Detroit Casino, CEO of the Bearwood Management Co., and co-owner of five African-American news publications, Pickard will deliver the commencement address Monday, May 22 at 8 a.m. in Panther Stadium.

Chevrolet and NNPA Offer Journalism Fellowship to HBCU Fellows

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Fellows will receive a combined $80,000 in scholarships and summer internships

The 2017 “Discover the Unexpected” Atlanta fellows (from left to right): Jordan Fisher, Clark Atlanta University; Kelsey Jones, Spelman College; Darrell Williams, Morehouse College; Chevrolet Diversity marketing manager, Michelle Alexander; Tiana Hunt, Clark Atlanta University; Ayron Lewallan, Morehouse College and; Taylor Burris, Spelman College.

WASHINGTON D.C. – Chevrolet is putting more students in the driver’s seat with the expansion of its Discover the Unexpected fellowship program. Now in its second year, DTU provides college students from historically black colleges and universities the opportunity to change the narrative of media reporting in the African-American community with the help of the National Newspaper Publishers Association.

The eight 2017 DTU Fellowship Program students are: Taylor Burris of Spelman College, Darrell Williams of Morehouse College, Jordan Fisher of Clark Atlanta University, Tiana Hunt of Clark Atlanta University, Kelsey Jones of Spelman College, Ayron Lewallen of Morehouse College, Noni Marshall of Howard University and Alexa Imani Spencer of Howard University.

Students will work in partnership with NNPA member papers in Washington D.C., Atlanta, New Orleans and Raleigh.

The official launch of the 2017 “Discover the Unexpected” fellows Program in Atlanta, (from left to right) Chevrolet Diversity marketing manager, Michelle Alexander; emcee-songwriter, philanthropist, actress, and DTU ambassador and spokesperson MC Lyte; National Newspapers Publishers Association President and CEO Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr.; and Clark Atlanta University School of Arts and Sciences Dean Danille K. Taylor, Ph.D.

“Last year we were honored to launch the DTU fellowship program at Howard University and meet a group of very talented journalism students,” said U.S. vice president of Chevrolet Marketing Paul Edwards. “Their enthusiasm, insight and determination made the selection process extremely difficult. We’re excited to send more trailblazers on the road to highlight the positive, inspire hope and document the legacy of African American voices for generations to come.”

This year, DTU fellows will work with editors and reporters from The Washington Informer, The Atlanta Voice, The Louisiana Weekly and The Carolinian.

“The NNPA is looking forward to welcoming the next group of fellows to the program,” said NNPA president and CEO Dr. Ben Chavis Jr. “Our 2016 fellows showed that despite the negative perceptions seen in the media, there are also beautiful and powerful stories in African-American neighborhoods across the country. Our 2017 fellows will continue sharing stories of community advocates, making impactful and lasting changes on a local and global level.”

The fellowship program is open to communications, mass media, and visual arts students. A panel of judges consisting of NNPA and AUCC staff conducted on-site interviews during the program’s AUCC launch.

Chevrolet will award eight $10,000 scholarships to each fellow and provide a stipend to defray the costs of traveling to and from school as they report on their stories. In addition to the financial investment, Chevrolet will provide each fellowship team access to the Next Generation 2018 Chevrolet Equinox during their reporting assignments.Legendary lyricist and hip-hop pioneer MC Lyte is the program’s national spokesperson and was on hand to kick-off the launch in Atlanta.Information about the Discover the Unexpected Fellowship Program can be found at www.nnpa.org/dtu.

Check out DTU photos.

 

CONTACTS:
Sonya Lewis
Carol H. Williams Advertising
708-439-0326
Sonya.Lewis@Carolhwilliams.com

Lester Booker Jr.
GM Diversity Communications
313-618-3946
lester.bookerjr@gm.com 

 

 

Celebrating the 40th Honoring Our Best & Brightest

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Partner institution 2017 graduates (left to right) Julian Pilate-Hutcherson, Morehouse/Notre Dame; Taira Fowler, Spelman/Notre Dame; Sanura Dewa, Spelman/Columbia University; and Brienne Coates, Spelman/Georgia Tech. Graduates not pictured include: Adrienne Fairbanks, Spelman/IUPUI; Jgenisius Harris, Spelman/Georgia Tech; Ron Hobson, Morehouse/Michigan; Emanuel Peterson Jr., CAU/Michigan; Lewis Jones, Morehouse/Michigan; Jenine McKoy, Spelman/Michigan; Philip Nwachokor, Morehouse/Michigan; Joi Officer, Spelman/IUPUI, Joseph Thibault Twahirwa, Morehouse/Notre Dame; Reginald Wilbourn, Morehouse/North Carolina A&T; Regis Wilbourn, Morehouse/North Carolina A&T.

Ninety-six students received nearly a quarter of a million dollars in scholarships and awards at the 40th Annual AUC Consortium Dual Degree Engineering Program Networking Event and Awards Ceremony, Saturday, April 15, at the Georgia Railroad Freight Depot. Hosted by DDEP graduates Marcus-Tor Strickland and Melody Thomas, the event is held to recognize outstanding dual-degree engineering students from Clark Atlanta UniversityMorehouse College and Spelman College. The awards banquet offers an opportunity to showcase all participants – students, partnering and member institutions, as well as the corporations who sponsor and hire Atlanta University Center students.

AUC schools are a primary feeder for minority students who enter engineering schools, including the No. 1 and No. 3 top bachelor’s degree producing institutions North Carolina A&T State University and Georgia Institute of Technology. AUC students have the benefit of receiving two degrees – one from the home institution and one from the engineering institution – in approximately five years.

Ceremony hosts were Marcus-Tor Strickland and Melody Thomas.

Students received the following awards:

AUCC DDEP Alumni of the Year

  • Corey Harris, Clark Atlanta University/Georgia Institute of Technology

This year’s recipient is the founder and CEO

Corey Harris

of HBIVENTURES LLC, a company that focuses on growth-stage entrepreneurship. His educational credentials include a bachelor’s of engineering and computer science from Georgia Institute of Technology and Clark Atlanta University. He also has an executive MBA from the Michael J. Coles School of Business at Kennesaw State University. His corporate background involves leadership responsibilities including managing teams at AT&T for the international deployment of network services, focusing primarily on network service delivery and assurance. Currently, he serves as a lead product developer for the AT&T Connected Car Team, working to expand AT&T’s reach into the “Internet of Things.” He is working with high school students, the city of Atlanta, and the Atlanta Tech Startup Community to encourage youth to pursue entrepreneurship in science and technology. Harris lives in Woodstock, Georgia, with his wife, Sharon, and their daughters.

Work Study Student Recognition

  • Natasja Baldwin, Freshman, DDEP, Spelman College
  • Imani Bey, Junior, Spelman College
  • Asia Kindley, Sophomore, Spelman College

With their tireless support, these students assist AUCC in moving projects forward. Without these students, much of the work of this office could not be possible.

ExxonMobil Achievement Award Recipients

  • Kayla Dean, Fourth-Year, Spelman College/Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Wayne Stevens, Fourth-Year, Morehouse College/Georgia Institute of Technology

ExxonMobil Most Outstanding Fourth-Year Chemical Engineering Student

  • Ogechi Irondi, Clark Atlanta University/Georgia Institute of Technology

ExxonMobil Most Outstanding Third-Year Mechanical Engineering Student

  • Andrew Davis, Morehouse College

Most Outstanding AUCC Dual Degree Engineering Students of the Year

This highest honor goes to students who have been extraordinary examples while matriculating and remaining an active participant in the program.

  • Marcus McCarty, Morehouse College

McCarty entered Morehouse College as a part of the Dual Degree Engineering Program Fall 2012. While at Morehouse, he pursued a general science degree with a sociology minor. Active in the SGA Senate as well as the marching band and the National Society of Black Engineers during his matriculation at Morehouse, McCarty also served as the Youth Minister at a local Atlanta church. He held two research and development internships with Procter & Gamble, one industrialization internship with Rockwell Automation, and returned to Procter & Gamble for his last internship in business development. McCarty transferred to Auburn University in the fall of 2015 and will complete a combined industrial engineering and mathematics degree in May. He has accepted a full-time position as a category development account manager with Procter & Gamble starting in June. He also intends to simultaneously obtain his graduate degrees in STEM education. He hopes to increase the enrollment and achievement of African-Americans in STEM and to show the benefits of a STEM degree in traditional and nontraditional STEM careers. He loves to give back, whether it through ministry or mentoring and wants to see others fulfill their purpose. His personal mission is McEagle – Making Certain Everyone Achieves, Gains, Leads, Excels.”

AUCC Outstanding Achievement Awards

Pictured left to right are Melvin Hill, Amadi White, Steven Ragland, Mykala Jones, Mya Gibbs, Naomi Edouard, Rakiya Winton and Michael Worthen.

This award is presented to students who have displayed outstanding achievement in their areas of concentration.

  • Arshad Ali, Most Outstanding Graphics Student, Morehouse College
  • India Banks, Most Outstanding Civil Engineering Student, Spelman College/University of Michigan
  • Kayla Dean, Most Outstanding DDEP Poster Presenters, Spelman College
  • Naomi Edouard, First-Year, Spelman College
  • Mya Gibbs, Second-Year, Spelman College
  • Ashlee Gordon, Most Outstanding Third-Year, Spelman College
  • Melvin Hill Jr., Fourth-Year, Morehouse College/Auburn University
  • David Holden, Most Outstanding Computer Science Student, Morehouse College
  • Jordan Howie, Most Outstanding Aerospace Engineering Student, Morehouse College/University of Michigan
  • Ogechi Irondi, Fourth-Year, Clark Atlanta University/Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Christopher Jackson, Most Outstanding Third-Year Student, Clark Atlanta University
  • Mykala Jones, Fourth-Year, Clark Atlanta University/Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Ashley Lofton, Fourth-Year, Spelman College/Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Tamia Middleton, Most Outstanding First-Year Student, Spelman College
  • Paris Napue, First-Year, Clark Atlanta University
  • Kayla Newsome, Most Outstanding Second-Year Student, Clark Atlanta University
  • Steven Ragland, Fourth-Year, Morehouse College/Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Micquel Roseman, Most Outstanding Graphics Student, Clark Atlanta University
  • Francis Rozier, Most Outstanding DDEP Poster Presenters, Morehouse College
  • Donovan White, Most Outstanding Second-Year Student, Morehouse College
  • Amadi White, Fourth-Year, Spelman College/North Carolina A&T
  • Elisa White, First-Year, Spelman College

Pictured left to right are Perry Francois-Edwards, Kayla Dean, Aisha Jackson, Courtney Wallace, Rakiya Winton, Anjali Coryat and Victor Green.

Leading By Example Awards

This award is presented to students who know what it means to lead by example.

  • Jeffery Butler, Second-Year, Morehouse College
  • Anjali Coryat, Second-Year, Spelman College
  • Kayla Dean, Fourth-Year, Spelman College/Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Perry Francois-Edwards, Fourth-Year, Morehouse College/University of Michigan
  • Victor Green, Second-Year, Clark Atlanta University
  • Aisha Jackson, Fifth-Year, Spelman College/Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Austin Little, Fourth-Year, Morehouse College/Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Jamila Moses, Fourth-Year, Spelman College/Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Josuel Musambaghani, Third-Year, Morehouse College
  • Hamim Nigena, Fifth-Year, Morehouse College/Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Indigo Rockmore, Third-Year, Spelman College
  • Courtney Wallace, Fourth-Year, Clark Atlanta University/North Carolina A&T
  • Rakiya Winton, Fourth-Year, Clark Atlanta University/Georgia Institute of Technology

Excellence Awards

This award if for those who exemplify excellence during the academic year.

  • Ariel Austin, First-Year, Spelman College
  • India Banks, Fourth-Year, Spelman College, University of Michigan
  • Jeffery Butler, Second-Year, Morehouse College
  • Imani Carson, First-Year, Spelman College
  • Saleigh Derico, Third-Year, Spelman College
  • Kanis Grady, Second-Year, Clark Atlanta University
  • Bakari Greene, Fourth-Year, Morehouse College, University of Michigan
  • David Holden, Second-Year, Morehouse College
  • Tyler Houston, Second-Year, Morehouse College
  • Kennedy Kishumba, Second-Year, Morehouse College
  • Alexander Meyer, Fourth-Year, Morehouse College/Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Nacarri Murphy, Fourth-Year, Spelman College/Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis
  • Eric Patterson, First-Year, Morehouse College
  • Jeremy Robinson, Third-Year, Clark Atlanta University
  • Shakirah Rogers, First-Year, Spelman College
  • Malik Schkoor, Second-Year, Morehouse College
  • Courtney Wallace, Fourth-Year, Clark Atlanta University/North Carolina A&T
  • Tyler White, Fourth-Year, Clark Atlanta University/North Carolina A&T

Pictured left to right are Roger Louisaire, Khristopher Shemwell and Chuck Harrell.

Engineering Success Awards

This award is for students who have gone above and beyond in their engineering discipline.

  • Chuck Harrell, Second-Year, Morehouse College
  • Roger Louisaire, Third-Year, Morehouse College
  • Nicholas Porter, Second-Year, Morehouse College
  • Khristopher Shemwell, First-Year, Morehouse College

Pictured left to right are Najma Thomas, Simone Paul, Hannah Floyd, Darrell Fambro, Lamar Lee, Nia Jones, Dinushka Herath, Saidah Coleman, Tamia Middleton, Theodore Cruz, Mykala Jones, Morgan Lipkins, Natasja Baldwin, Kayla Dean and Donovan White.

Shining Star Awards

  1. Frank Adams, Fourth-Year, Clark Atlanta University/North Carolina A&T
  2. Natasja Baldwin, Second-Year, Spelman College
  3. Saidah Coleman, Second-Year, Spelman College
  4. Theodore Cruz, Second-Year, Morehouse College
  5. Kayla Dean, Fourth-Year, Spelman College/Georgia Institute of Technology
  6. Darrell Fambro, Third-Year, Clark Atlanta University
  7. Hannah Floyd, Third-Year, Spelman College
  8. Dinushka Herath, Third-Year, Clark Atlanta University/Georgia Institute of Technology
  9. Jordan Howie, Fourth-Year, Morehouse College/University of Michigan
  10. Lamar Lee, Third-Year, Morehouse College
  11. Morgan Lipkins, Second-Year, Spelman College
  12. Mykala Jones, Fourth-Year, Clark Atlanta University/Georgia Institute of Technology
  13. Nia Jones, Third-Year, Clark Atlanta University
  14. Tamia Middleton, First-Year, Spelman College
  15. Ashley Murphy, Third-Year, Spelman College
  16. Simone Paul, Third-Year, Spelman College
  17. Cedric Porter, Third-Year, Morehouse College
  18. Rashaad Robinson, Fourth-Year, Clark Atlanta University/North Carolina A&T
  19. Najma Thomas, First-Year, Spelman College
  20. Donovan White, Second-Year, Morehouse College

See more photos.

Melody Thomas

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Melody Thomas is a Dual Degree Engineering Program graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Physics from Clark Atlanta University and a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Indiana University Purdue University – Indianapolis.

While attending IUPUI as a full-time student, she had the opportunity to intern at Jacobs Engineering Group, a global provider of technical, professional, and scientific services, including engineering, architecture, construction, operations and maintenance.

As a mechanical intern in Jacobs’ pharmaceutical and biotechnology market, some of Thomas’ duties included supporting senior engineers in the design of HVAC systems via AutoCAD, assisting with site takeoffs of existing building conditions, and maintaining client contacts, milestone schedules, and co-leading weekly client project meetings. Soon after, Thomas joined Jacobs as a part-time cost analyst, gaining some unique experience for someone who had pursued an engineering education.

Upon graduation, she continued at Jacobs as a full-time employee, but could not shake her desire to be farther south. Having finally found her passion, Thomas recently relocated to Atlanta, where she is now a roadway designer for ARCADIS, the leading global design and consultancy firm for natural and built assets.

Outside of her career, Thomas enjoys spending time with family, friends and her new puppy. Now that she has returned to Atlanta, she is looking forward to becoming active in the community as a proud member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. and Elizabeth Baptist Church, and enjoying the wonderful weather in “Hotlanta.”

AUC Schools Rank High Among Peace Corps’ Top Volunteer-Producing Historically Black Colleges and Universities

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Contact:
Emily Webb, Public Affairs Specialist
Peace Corps East Region Office
ewebb@peacecorps.gov
212.352.5455

Faith Toran, Spelman College Class of 2013, was a Peace Corps Education Volunteer in Burkina Faso from August 2013 to September 2015.

ATLANTA – Today, the Peace Corps announced its 2017 rankings of the top volunteer-producing Historically Black Colleges and Universities and two Atlanta area schools were included on the annual list.

This year, Spelman College ranks No. 2 with 11 alumni volunteering in the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Mozambique, Namibia, Peru, Rwanda, Togo, Zambia and Guinea. In addition, Morehouse College appears on the list at No. 5 with three alumni serving in Malawi, Mozambique and Namibia. Morehouse and Spelman both place among the top five HBCUs in the nation for the third and sixth consecutive times, respectively.

“Historically Black Colleges and Universities cultivate a commitment to community-oriented education that inspires their graduates to pursue international service and make an impact abroad with the Peace Corps,” Acting Peace Corps Director Sheila Crowley said. “Each year, a growing number of HBCU alumni join the Peace Corps with important experiences and perspectives that give communities overseas a better understanding of the diversity of the United States.”

Spelman College also appeared on Peace Corps’ national list of top volunteer-producing colleges and universities this year, ranking No. 7 among small undergraduate schools. The Atlanta area ranks No. 9 among Peace Corps’ top volunteer-producing metropolitan areas with 140 residents currently serving worldwide.

Service in the Peace Corps is a life-defining, hands-on leadership experience that offers volunteers the opportunity to travel to a community overseas and make a lasting difference in the lives of others. College graduates with Peace Corps volunteer experience gain cross-cultural, language and community development skills that build upon their education and give them a competitive edge for career and advanced education opportunities.

The Peace Corps has recruiters across the country that visit HBCUs and work closely with prospective volunteers. By hiring dedicated diversity recruiters and hosting diversity-focused recruitment events, the agency aims to build an inclusive volunteer force and ensure that all Americans know about service opportunities with the Peace Corps.

A simple and personal Peace Corps application process can be completed online in about one hour. Applicants can learn more about service opportunities by visiting the Peace Corps website and connecting with a recruiter.

Peace Corps’ 2017 top volunteer-producing Historically Black Colleges and Universities are:

  1. Howard University: 18 currently serving volunteers
  2. Spelman College: 11 currently serving volunteers
  3. Florida A&M University: seven currently serving volunteers
  4. Hampton University: four currently serving volunteers
  5. Central State University: three currently serving volunteers
  6. Morehouse College: three currently serving volunteers
  7. Prairie View A&M University: three currently serving volunteers

* Rankings are calculated based on fiscal year 2016 data as of September 30, 2016, as self-reported by Peace Corps volunteers.

About the Peace Corps: The Peace Corps sends Americans with a passion for service abroad on behalf of the United States to work with communities and create lasting change. Volunteers develop sustainable solutions to address challenges in education, health, economic development, agriculture, environment and youth development. Through their Peace Corps experience, Volunteers gain a unique cultural understanding and a life-long commitment to service that positions them to succeed in today’s global economy. Since President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps in 1961, more than 225,000 Americans of all ages have served in 141 countries worldwide. For more information, visit peacecorps.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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