Atlanta University Center Consortium

Five AUC Freshmen Place Second in ILI T.I.M.E. Challenge

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Pictured left to right: Zelalem Tenaw, Carter Bowdoin, Leoul Tilahun, Stephen Seymour and Nicolette Barriffe.

Five, first-year dual degree engineering students placed second in  a high-level science, technology, engineering, math, and entrepreneurial activity to “imagineer” innovative practical uses and business models for NASA technology in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Nicolette Barriffee, electrical engineering, Clark Atlanta University; and Morehouse College students Carter Bowdoin, mechanical engineering; Stephen Seymour, mechanical engineering; Zelalem Tenaw, computer science; and Leoul Tilahun, computer engineering, along with 20 students from historically Black colleges and universities, minority serving institutions, and institutions of higher learning, took on the task to take existing NASA-patented technologies to the marketplace in the Institute for Local Innovations T.I.M.E. Challenge.

The students second-place winning for their Riverside Water Purification landed them  $750 plus a $250 book stipend for each student.

NASA is challenged with hundreds of patented technologies ready to be taken to the marketplace, and too few entrepreneurs ready to move them.

New Orleans-based ILI Inc., in collaboration with Atlanta-based Liquid Studios design firm, is brings a High Impact Practice to HBCUs across the country by way of the ILI Technology Implementation Market Engine Challenge. This innovative student engagement program invites individual students, teams of HBCU students, as well as students from other colleges and university led by HBCU students to participate in the program.

In addition to the winnings, participating students receive mentoring from industry experts, via the Liquid Studios network (www.liquidstudios360.com) and others, to increase student knowledge, skills, and career interests in economic sectors aligned with NASA-patented technology identified by ILI.

Check out the competition in pictures.

AUC Receives ARC’s Developments of Excellence Award

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The Atlanta Regional Commission recently announced the winners of this year’s Developments of Excellence awards during the agency’s State of the Region Breakfast. The awards recognize the developments and places that are improving quality of life in the 10-county Atlanta region.

The top award, the 2017 Development of Excellence, went to Parsons Alley, a retail development and gathering space in Duluth that brought a carefully planned community vision to life.

ARC also presented its Great Places Award to the Atlanta University Center, whose Civil Rights legacy and steadfast commitment to community enhance the region’s character every day.

Great Place Award: Atlanta University Center

Atlanta University Center Consortium
Every year, ARC presents a Great Place award to a place in the region that enhances metro Atlanta’s character. The winner of this year’s Great Place award is the Atlanta University Center, the world’s oldest and largest cluster of African-American private colleges. The AUC Consortium includes Morehouse College, Spelman College, Clark Atlanta University, and Morehouse School of Medicine.

Morris Brown College and the Interdenominational Theological Center also share the campus and are significant in its rich legacy. That legacy dates back to the late 1800s when Morehouse, Spelman, Clark Atlanta, and Morris Brown were founded to educate newly freed enslaved individuals.

Many of the original buildings are still in use, and the campus is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The AUC was a wellspring for the Civil Rights movement, producing leaders like the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Ralph David Abernathy, Lonnie King, Julian Bond, and Ruby Doris Smith. Other prominent alumni and faculty include W.E.B. DuBois, Pearl Cleage, Marian Wright-Edelman, and Spike Lee.

The schools of the Atlanta University Center are committed to helping the surrounding neighborhoods, engaging in more than 100,000 hours of community service each year.

For more on the awards breakfast, visit: ARC.

AUC Welcomes its New Class of Students

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Around the Atlanta University Center, the 2017-2018 academic year is in full effect. From football to algorithmic computations, first-time college and final-year students ready themselves for the AUC experience. Check out below what’s going on at our partner campuses.

 

 

 


Clark Atlanta University

Clark Atlanta University is a comprehensive, private, urban, coeducational institution of higher education. Established in 1988 through the consolidation of its two parent institutions, Atlanta University (1865), and Clark College (1869), it offers undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees as well as certificate programs to students of diverse racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds.

 


Morehouse College

In 1867, two years after the Civil War ended, Augusta Theological Institute was established in the basement of Springfield Baptist Church in Augusta, Georgia.  The school’s primary purpose was to prepare black men for ministry and teaching. Today, Augusta Theological Institute is Morehouse College, which is located on a 66-acre campus in Atlanta and enjoys an international reputation for producing leaders who have influenced national and world history.

 


Morehouse School of Medicine

MSM was founded in 1975 as the Medical Education Program at Morehouse College. In 1981, it became an independently chartered institution and is now among the nation’s leading educators of primary care physicians. MSM is recognized as the top institution among U.S. medical schools for our social mission. Our faculty and alumni are noted in their fields for excellence in teaching, research and public policy.

 


Spelman College 

Founded in 1881 as the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary, it became Spelman College in 1924. Now a global leader in the education of women of African descent, Spelman is dedicated to academic excellence in the liberal arts and sciences and the intellectual, creative, ethical, and leadership development of its students. It is also a proud members of the Atlanta University Center Consortium.

Not Just for Eating, Potatoes Make Engineers

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M-T co-hosting the April 2017 AUCC/DDEP Awards Ceremony.

Middle school marks a milestone in life for many young minds. For Marcus-Tor Strickland, it marked a career turning point. After performing a sixth-grade science project, his trajectory was to become an engineer.

“I didn’t know what I was doing was called engineering,” said the dual degree engineering alumni who graduated from Morehouse College with a degree in mathematics and an electrical engineering degree from Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla, Missouri. “I just liked lighting up a light bulb with a potato.”

M-T, as he prefers to be called, has moved beyond “potato electricity” to managing large-scale business and manufacturing processes and quality analysis and improvements for Fortune 500 companies such as Clorox, Nucor, GM and Time Warner. Today, he is a business development engineer for Murata Electronics, a global designer, manufacturer, and supplier of advanced electronics materials and components, and multifunctional high-density modules.

Imbued with a heart to serve, M-T’s service work began as a youngster by volunteering with Hosea Feed the Hungry. Through service, he strives to be the “most valuable man in the world.”

“Not through monetary or material gains, but in a way I can positively impact everyone I come in contact with,” said M-T, who feels his desire to help others has led to his success as a corporate and community leader. “Every skill I take to work, every piece of knowledge I have gained, has been forged and hardened through community volunteer work.”

M-T at Missouri University of Science and Technology

Some of his volunteer work includes advising an i21 STEM NSBE Jr. Chapter, a group of aspiring engineers supported by the Atlanta University Center National Society of Black Engineers’ chapter, and being an assistant Scout Master of Boy Scout Troop 100 in Atlanta.

A proud AUCC/DDEP alumnus, M-T credits the program with opening doors that allowed him to take a hold of his future.

“Being a part of the AUCC/Dual Degree Engineering Program allowed me to develop communication and presentation skills that most engineers don’t focus on and enabled me to attend and matriculate to a top-five engineering institution,” said M-T whose name, Marcus, means warrior in ancient Greek, and Tor, means King in old southwest African Swahili.

“That combined with the drive to find mentors, internships and co-ops every summer I was in school, has propelled me into many positions, including my current one with Murata, where I have been an integral part of a multibillion-dollar corporation and in some cases an agent for change and growth.”

On July 29, M-T’s StricklyUNLTD will host #BeUNLTD👑2017, a back-to-school bash to share engineering career opportunities with young minds. He can be reached socially, @Brotha_MT, or email, BrothaMT@StricklyUnlimited.com, or phone, 404-941-4MTS for more information.

Michigan is a Great Place to Learn, Work and Play

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AUCC students on campus 2017

Established in 2004, the University of Michigan College of Engineering Dual Degree in Engineering is a partnership between the University of Michigan and the colleges of the Atlanta University Center Consortium. This unique collaboration provides a successful pathway for students to complement a liberal arts degree with an engineering degree from one of the world’s top universities.

Rich in learning experiences and opportunities and a phenomenal launching pad for success, the University of Michigan drives the thriving economy in Ann Arbor, Michigan, the state’s sixth largest city. Abundant in research programs and integrated technology implemented and supported by Michigan graduates, Ann Arbor offers a broad cultural heritage of visual and performing art. In 2017, Forbes ranked Ann Arbor the best college town in the country.

As the No. 1 ranked-U.S. public research university by the National Science Foundation with $1.39 billion in research expenditures, 2.8 million square feet of lab space for research and teaching, and 428 new invention reports, Michigan houses one of the top engineering schools in the country. The UM College of Engineering maintains top-10 rankings in nearly every one of its undergraduate and graduate engineering program.

UM/AUCC DDEP women celebrating Spelman’s Founders Day

Why Michigan Engineering?

All Michigan Engineering’s graduate and undergraduate programs rand No. 5 and No. 6 in the nation. Its engineering specialties include aerospace, biomedical, chemical, climate and space sciences and engineering, civil, computer science, electrical, environmental, industrial and operations, materials science and engineering, mechanical, naval architecture and marine, and nuclear and radiological sciences.

Exceptional Leadership

Dean Alec Gallimore

Our dean is a “Rocket Scientist”, no, really! Alec D. Gallimore is the Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering at The University of Michigan, as well as the Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Professor and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering. His lab works with NASA and the U.S. Air Force on a prototype propulsion system that is considering a future mission for sending humans to Mars.

Applying to the College of Engineering
Begin your application to the College of Engineering by visiting: http://www.engin.umich.edu/college/admissions/undergrad/transfer/applying.

The Michigan Difference
Transitioning from the AUC to a top-tier engineering school has its innate challenges and multiple benefits. At Michigan Engineering, we provide a network of support to ease the transition from the time you seriously consider Michigan until you complete your degree. Here are some of the ways we facilitate the process:

UM’s Commitment to Diversity is Broad and Deep

President Mark Schlissel

“At the University of Michigan, our dedication to academic excellence for the public good is inseparable from our commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion. It is central to our mission as an educational institution to ensure that each member of our community has full opportunity to thrive in our environment, for we believe that diversity is key to individual flourishing, educational excellence and the advancement of knowledge.”
President Schlissel’s Charge to the U-M Community for a Strategic Planning Process on Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

The Center for Engineering Diversity & Outreach
CEDO is a hub for students and student organizations from diverse backgrounds. CEDO provides expertise, leadership, and programming that supports the College of Engineering’s belief that an excellent educational experience is intrinsically linked to fostering a climate that celebrates diversity, equity, and inclusion for faculty, staff and students.

Scholarships

Visiting student group on State Street in Ann Arbor

Students who are admitted to Michigan Engineering receive an Engineering Scholarship of Honor. The scholarship award is $30,000 per year for up to 2.5 years for out of state students, and $15,000 per year for up to 2.5 years for in-state students.

Students currently enrolled in the College of Engineering, and doing well academically, are encouraged to review, and consider applying for the scholarships additional engineering scholarships. The two most common scholarships awarded are the College of Engineering Need- and Merit-Based Scholarships, and the Industry Sponsored Scholarships. Visit https://scholarships.engin.umich.edu/current-students/ for more information.

UM/AUCC DDEP Senior Leadership Group
SLG is a student-driven organization created by upper-level UM/AUCC DDEP students. Their goal is to maintain the UM/AUCC DDEP community, recruit students to the University of Michigan, and help ease the transition from AUC to Michigan Engineering.

Michigan Difference Summer Transition Program
The Michigan Difference Summer Transition Program provides resources and experiences for AUC DDEP students to be engaged in summer experiences on UM’s campus to help ease the transition from the AUC to a top-ranked engineering college.  

  • Summer Research Opportunity and Admissions Pathway is a program for AUC dual degree engineering students. If you are interested in a deeper dive into engineering research to address grand challenges that face our nation, this summer opportunity always you to work in labs of Michigan Engineering world-renowned engineering faculty for 10 weeks. The program includes room and board, travel and a stipend.
  • Michigan Department of Transportation offers an opportunity for students from historically black colleges and universities who have completed their first, second, or third year of college to do a paid summer internship with them. The program helps students understand whether civil engineering is a match for them, and they gain exposure to the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering. Participants from the AUCC reside on the University of Michigan’s campus and have an opportunity to explore the College of Engineering and the vast resources available at Michigan.

    Faculty-student mentoring dinner

Additional Opportunities

The breadth of Michigan allows for almost unlimited opportunities and resources to ensure your success. Faculty, staff, and offices are committed to help you make your Michigan experience all that you want it to be. Explore the possibilities, set your goals, and take advantage of the many ways to ensure you reach them.

Mentoring programs include:

  • Partnerships between faculty, undergraduate students, and graduate students to support the learning and success of DDEP scholars.
  • Monthly dinners with faculty and graduate students create multiple opportunities for DDEP students such as research, extended employment networking and one-on-one mentoring.

NSBE social

Student Life

Matthew Nelson is NSBE national chair and a UM graduate student

Michigan is home to over 1,300 student organizations ranging from Greek to social activism, including the National Society of Black Engineers, Society of Women Engineers, and project teams like BLUElab and the Solar Car Team. Michigan Engineers hold prominent offices at all levels of the NSBE organization, with Matt Nelson, Michigan graduate student, currently serving as national chair of NSBE.. You will be inspired and challenged and your world will expand as you work with peers from every state and over 114 nations. Ann Arbor is the “quintessential college town” — vibrant, friendly, and rich in culture. The school spirit is amazing, and Michigan athletics are always a source of pride and excitement. Go Blue!

Morehouse College Announces the Passing of Interim President William J. ‘Bill’ Taggart

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Morehouse Community reflects on the life and legacy of a devoted and respected Morehouse leader

ATLANTA  (June 8, 2017) – The Morehouse College Board of Trustees is mourning the loss of Interim President William J. “Bill” Taggart. Interim President Taggart passed away unexpectedly Thursday at his home in Atlanta.

“We are deeply saddened by the sudden passing of Bill Taggart, a beloved colleague, father and friend whom I’ve known for many years,” said Willie Woods, ’85, Chairman of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees. “For the past two years, Bill devoted himself wholeheartedly to Morehouse College and we were pleased when he assumed the role of Interim President. We are eternally grateful for his loyal support, counsel and the leadership he provided to students, faculty and alumni.”

Woods continued, “Bill was a good friend and a beloved member of the Morehouse community. He was a strong leader who had a positive impact on Morehouse College, the greater Atlanta business community, and all those who knew him. Bill leaves behind a long legacy of commitment to others and unwavering integrity. On behalf of the Board of Trustees, and the entire Morehouse Community, we extend our sincerest condolences to his family, friends and loved ones he leaves behind during this difficult time.”

An Atlanta native, Interim President Taggart was appointed to lead Morehouse College on April 7, 2017. He brought more than 30 years of professional experience to the role.Prior to that, Interim President Taggart served as the College’s Chief Operating Officer, beginning in 2015.

Interim President Taggart worked closely with the Board of Trustees, students, faculty, staff, and alumni to lead and transform the institutional development, technology, campus operations, and human resources functions of the College. During this time, he also served as the external relations liaison to the Atlanta business and civic community, as well as with corporate America and various global philanthropic organizations.

Outside of Morehouse College, Interim President Taggart was actively involved in various business and civic organizations. He served as CEO of Atlanta Life Financial Group and was a key member of 100 Black Men of America, as well as the Rotary Club of Atlanta. He also served as chairman of the Atlanta Business League, and was a board member of The Carter Center, Woodruff Arts Center, Westside Future Fund, Carver Bank, and Children Healthcare of Atlanta. He was recently named to the 2018 Class of Leadership Atlanta. Interim President Taggart’s contributions within and outside of Morehouse College are a reflection of his immense dedication and commitment to his community.

The Board of Trustees will be working internally to determine its next steps and the future direction of the College. Provost Michael Hodge will serve as Acting President until a new Interim President is named by the Board of Trustees.

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Ranked America’s fifth “Most Entrepreneurial College” by Forbes Magazine in 2015, Morehouse College is the nation’s largest liberal arts college for men. Founded in 1867, the College enrolls approximately 2,100 students and historically has conferred more bachelor’s degrees on black men than any other institution in the world. Morehouse College is one of the two top producers of Rhodes Scholars among HBCUs. Prominent alumni include Martin Luther King Jr., Nobel Peace Prize laureate; Dr. David Satcher, former U.S. Surgeon General; Shelton “Spike” Lee, American filmmaker; Maynard H. Jackson, the first African American mayor of Atlanta, Ga.; and Jeh Johnson, former Secretary of Homeland Security.

AUCC Mourns the Loss of Bill Taggart

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The Atlanta University Center Consortium is deeply saddened by the sudden loss of Morehouse College Interim President William J. “Bill” Taggart.  This is a devastating loss to  the Atlanta University Center.  As the newest administrative leader in the consortium, Interim President Taggart was a trusted and valued leader, businessman and friend.

The students, faculty, and staff of Spelman College, Clark Atlanta University, and Morehouse School of Medicine offer profound condolences to our partners at Morehouse College and the Taggart family during this trying time.   We surround our Morehouse College colleagues and fellow students with open arms of love and support.

Valerie Montgomery Rice, MD.
Chair of the AUC Council of Presidents
President and Dean Morehouse School of Medicine

AUC Commencement Roundup

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Morehouse School of Medicine graduates received a welcomed surprise at its 33rd commencement exercises.

From Saturday, May 20, to Monday, May 22, Atlanta University Center institutions celebrated graduation ceremonies for more than 1,600 students. In Morehouse School of Medicine’s commencement exercises Saturday, the 2017 graduating class of 57 medical doctors, 11 doctorate candidates and 41 public health, medical science, and clinical research master’s degree candidates received a welcomed surprise from MSM President and Dean Dr. Valerie Montgomery Rice.

Find out about the surprise.

Morehouse College graduates were told by speaker Van Jones they will “confront a radically new era.”

Early Sunday morning in Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel, CNN political analyst Van Jones told nearly 300 Morehouse College graduates they “must lead the charge of a new, post-Obama era” at the college’s 133rd commencement. Included in the 300 were perfect 4.0 GPA co-valedictorians Michael C. Scott, of Rockville, Maryland, an economics major, and Douglas Bowen, of Montego Bay, Jamaica, also an economics major.

Check out Morehouse’s Facebook photos.

Spelman College co-valedictorians Muhire Kwizera (at podium) and K’yal Bannister (right).

Sunday afternoon, Spelman College, also perfect, 4.0 co-valedictorians, Muhire Kwizera, a mathematics major from Kigali, Rwanda, K’yal Bannister, a chemistry/dual degree engineering major from Bushnell, Florida, and 488 other graduates were told by Valerie Jarrett, former senior adviser to President Barack Obama: “Change often seems impossible until we make it inevitable.”

See Spelman’s commencement photo gallery.

Hometown girl Jakayla Woolridge was named Clark Atlanta

Clark Atlanta University valedictorian Jakayla Woolridge.

University’s valedictorian. A product of Atlanta Public Schools’ Carver Early College, Woolridge graduated with more than 700 CAU classmates receiving their bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral and specialist degrees.

Experience CAU’s 2017 commencement energy on Twitter.

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